Additional information

SS officers’ colony
Information can be found here.

Memorial complex
Information can be found here.

Soviet Special Camp No. 2
Information on the history can be found here.

Cemeteries

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Photo: Katharina Brand

Ash grave

In 1944/45, the SS had ashes from the crematorium dumped into a natural depression in the earth near the SS officers’ colony. The ash grave was rediscovered in 1965, landscaped and dedicated in 1967, and later neglected. After being uncovered once again in 1993/94, it was furnished with MEMENTO stones from the 1949 "Grove of Honour".

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Photo: Naomi Tereza Salmon

Ring graves

In March/April 1945, the SS had approximately 3,000 corpses buried in natural depressions in the earth on the southern slope of the Ettersberg. Within the framework of the memorial’s construction in the 1950s, three of these burial pits were landscaped as ring graves.

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Photo: Peter Hansen

Cemetery near the bell tower

Even after the liberation of the concentration camp, former inmates continued to die as a result of the conditions they had suffered during their imprisonment. Between the end of April and June 1945, 400 dead were interred in graves arranged in rows on the southern slope of the Ettersberg near the Bismarck Tower. The 1,286 urns which had been stored in the cellar of the tower and in the crematorium were also buried here. The graves were shifted within the context of the memorial’s construction. Since 1996, the newly landscaped cemetery has displayed the names of the dead.

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Photo: Peter Hansen

Ashes and skeletal remains

The ashes found during restoration work in the crematorium in 1997 as well as skeletal remains which came to the memorial in 2004 from the collection of the Historisches Museum Berlin are buried here at the cemetery near the bell tower.

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Photo: Peter Hansen

Earth and ashes

In the interior of the bell tower there are earth and ashes from other sites of National Socialist terror, concentration and extermination camps. They were brought to Buchenwald in April 1954 within the framework of a memorial ceremony. The names of the sites are inscribed in a bronze slab designed by the sculptor Waldemar Grzimek to serve as a cover and marker.

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Photo: Naomi Tereza Salmon

The graveyards of the Soviet special camp

At the end of 1989, the public learned of the existence of graveyards where the victims of the Soviet special camp were buried. The anonymous mass graves to the north of the camp and near the railway station were marked with steel steles and landscaped as forest cemeteries. In February 1990, the memorial erected the first cross in the northern graveyard. That site eventually became an place of individual mourning with crosses and commemorative stones.